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  1. Question Quilling with Metal

    In the history of quill work, it was once done with thin strips of metal. Are there any books available on learning to quill with metal. Does anyone know what type of metal would be a good choice to learn this with? I've sketched out some ideas and would really like to see if they work and how they look.

    Thank you in advance for any ideas/suggestions as all is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    The history of paper quilling is sketchy and some of what you might read is assumption. Some say in ancient times paper quilling was done in order to copy the metal filigree work produced in those times. Metal, no matter how thin, I believe has to be heated in order to bend it and keep its shape, so I honestly don't think metal was 'quilled' in the same sense that we know of it.

    There are two different types of quilling that I know of. One is done with paper strips coiled around a bird quill, hence the term 'quilling.' The other is done by Native American Indians using softened porcupine quills in the making of Indian accessories/adornments, jewelry, etc.

    A library should have books on metal filigree that might help you.

    Gail

    QUOTE=KritterJo]In the history of quill work, it was once done with thin strips of metal. Are there any books available on learning to quill with metal. Does anyone know what type of metal would be a good choice to learn this with? I've sketched out some ideas and would really like to see if they work and how they look.

    Thank you in advance for any ideas/suggestions as all is appreciated.[/QUOTE]

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KritterJo
    In the history of quill work, it was once done with thin strips of metal. Are there any books available on learning to quill with metal. Does anyone know what type of metal would be a good choice to learn this with? I've sketched out some ideas and would really like to see if they work and how they look.

    Thank you in advance for any ideas/suggestions as all is appreciated.
    DISCLAIMER: I have zero experience with metal filigree, so the views below are second-hand info and distant memory

    My MIL used tin cans to create doll furniture. She had ceased this hobby long before I met her son, but I DO remember getting a very victorian rocking chair for my Barbie doll (actually, I had Skipper and my older sissy had the bodacious Barbie). It was very intricate and did resemble the scrolls of paper filigree. As I remember, the metal was about 1/8" wide also...maybe a bit wider. It wasn't very sturdy and did not hold up to play very well (I was 5-6 years old at the time). I do remember the edges were very sharp! It would never pass safety inspection nowadays. I don't think heat was used for this soft tin...it was thin and cut from tin cans so it bent easily. Unfortunately my MIL passed away on 12/09/07 so I can't ask her more about it. But you would certainly need tools to assist with the coiling, and maybe even gloves (the sharp edges would cut fingers), and I would think a good deal of hand and wrist strength to do it for long stretches.

    I haven't seen furniture like that for many, many years. Would be interesting to see if eBay has some listed. Might be found under dollhouse furniture - "wrought tin " or "coiled tin" maybe?

    Gail is correct that heat is used with precious metal filigree work. The thin precious metal wire is easily manipulated without heat but needs to be soldered together -- which is why the heat is necessary. A heavier-guage wire may require heating in order to manipulate easily as Gail indicated. I have never been fortunate to see precious-metal filigree work being created, so I am not speaking from a point of knowledge on the techniques needed.

    However, about 8 years ago we watched a street-side vendor in Mexico take just a few minutes to whip out personalized name pins for our daughters -- using just a pair of needle-nose pliers and a spool of golden wire (not precious metal but some sort of alloy, as it tarnished pretty quickly) No heat was used, though it was certainly warm enough weather-wise!

    Googling it should give you some references and books to check out. Would be awesome if youtube had a video clip of a jewelry artist creating metal filigree. (I'll check out of curiousity!)
    Blessings,
    Paula - the Gem State quiller
    "Give it a Twirl" - blog & Gem State Quilling - website
    Hydrangea instructions now available - plus others
    click for more info

  4. #4

    Default There was a video at youtube!

    This is on Russian metal filigree . Simply beautiful work by Victoria Lansford. She apparently manipulates the metal without heat, and uses a soldering gun to 'glue' the design together.

    She has courses and instructional DVD's too.
    here


    Man! Now I want to try this!! LOL
    Last edited by gemstatemom; 01-08-2008 at 12:33 PM.
    Blessings,
    Paula - the Gem State quiller
    "Give it a Twirl" - blog & Gem State Quilling - website
    Hydrangea instructions now available - plus others
    click for more info

  5. #5
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    Paula:

    A co-worker's daughter also does names just bending the wire with needlenose pliers. A lot of scrapbookers use it, also home decoration on candle holders, etc. Tons of things you can do with it.

    If you want to see a whole lot more possibilities of wire work, go to HGTV and click on crafts, then the categories will show, click on wire/metal. It also goes good with quilling.

    Gail

    Quote Originally Posted by gemstatemom
    DISCLAIMER: I have zero experience with metal filigree, so the views below are second-hand info and distant memory

    My MIL used tin cans to create doll furniture. She had ceased this hobby long before I met her son, but I DO remember getting a very victorian rocking chair for my Barbie doll (actually, I had Skipper and my older sissy had the bodacious Barbie). It was very intricate and did resemble the scrolls of paper filigree. As I remember, the metal was about 1/8" wide also...maybe a bit wider. It wasn't very sturdy and did not hold up to play very well (I was 5-6 years old at the time). I do remember the edges were very sharp! It would never pass safety inspection nowadays. I don't think heat was used for this soft tin...it was thin and cut from tin cans so it bent easily. Unfortunately my MIL passed away on 12/09/07 so I can't ask her more about it. But you would certainly need tools to assist with the coiling, and maybe even gloves (the sharp edges would cut fingers), and I would think a good deal of hand and wrist strength to do it for long stretches.

    I haven't seen furniture like that for many, many years. Would be interesting to see if eBay has some listed. Might be found under dollhouse furniture - "wrought tin " or "coiled tin" maybe?

    Gail is correct that heat is used with precious metal filigree work. The thin precious metal wire is easily manipulated without heat but needs to be soldered together -- which is why the heat is necessary. A heavier-guage wire may require heating in order to manipulate easily as Gail indicated. I have never been fortunate to see precious-metal filigree work being created, so I am not speaking from a point of knowledge on the techniques needed.

    However, about 8 years ago we watched a street-side vendor in Mexico take just a few minutes to whip out personalized name pins for our daughters -- using just a pair of needle-nose pliers and a spool of golden wire (not precious metal but some sort of alloy, as it tarnished pretty quickly) No heat was used, though it was certainly warm enough weather-wise!

    Googling it should give you some references and books to check out. Would be awesome if youtube had a video clip of a jewelry artist creating metal filigree. (I'll check out of curiousity!)

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by freedgailf
    Paula:


    If you want to see a whole lot more possibilities of wire work, go to HGTV and click on crafts, then the categories will show, click on wire/metal. It also goes good with quilling.

    Gail

    Thanks, Gail! Will have to check that out at some point when things slow down here.
    Blessings,
    Paula - the Gem State quiller
    "Give it a Twirl" - blog & Gem State Quilling - website
    Hydrangea instructions now available - plus others
    click for more info

  7. #7
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    Paula:

    Most of what I've seen demonstrated of wire work on HGTV is shown on the Carol Duval Show, which I watch faithfully every day at 8:30 a.m. PST. They took the show off the air for a while, but so many people (including myself) sent them irate emails gripping about them doing that, they put the show back on. I'm so glad they did, it's the only craft show they had that is worth watching.

    Gail

    Quote Originally Posted by gemstatemom
    Thanks, Gail! Will have to check that out at some point when things slow down here.

  8. Default Thank you!

    Thank you everyone for all your replies. There are some really awesome places you're given me to check out. I've got the general idea of how I'd like to work the designs I've sketched. My biggest problem is seeking a metal I can work with while learning. Sterling and gold are a bit too expensive to practice with. Some metals used with wire wrapping or wire you might use on a wire jig will not work for what I have in mind. I've noticed on some pieces made with the wire wrapping techniques, where a flat wire/metal is used. Does anyone know where this type of wire/metal can be found? I don't believe the width of this wire has been cut. This would be ultimate since there won't be any dangerous edges.

    I appreciate you and your help! I appreciate any other ideas, links, etc. you might have.

  9. #9
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    Kritter Jo:

    Just go with cut aluminum soft drink cans. I think that's about as thin and flexible a metal you're going to find for whatever it is you're trying to do.

    Actually, not knowing what you are doing, except that you have some sketches of some thing you want to do using metal, it's impossible to recommend or suggest anything. I'm afraid mind-reading is not my specialty.

    Gail

    Quote Originally Posted by KritterJo
    Thank you everyone for all your replies. There are some really awesome places you're given me to check out. I've got the general idea of how I'd like to work the designs I've sketched. My biggest problem is seeking a metal I can work with while learning. Sterling and gold are a bit too expensive to practice with. Some metals used with wire wrapping or wire you might use on a wire jig will not work for what I have in mind. I've noticed on some pieces made with the wire wrapping techniques, where a flat wire/metal is used. Does anyone know where this type of wire/metal can be found? I don't believe the width of this wire has been cut. This would be ultimate since there won't be any dangerous edges.

    I appreciate you and your help! I appreciate any other ideas, links, etc. you might have.
    Last edited by freedgailf; 01-11-2008 at 07:22 PM.

  10. Question

    Quote Originally Posted by KritterJo
    In the history of quill work, it was once done with thin strips of metal. Are there any books available on learning to quill with metal. Does anyone know what type of metal would be a good choice to learn this with? I've sketched out some ideas and would really like to see if they work and how they look.

    Thank you in advance for any ideas/suggestions as all is appreciated.

    Well I have a friend here in Idaho and he is an expert in those areas maybe he can give you some suggestions... he calls me the ceooflove because of this nickname I meet alot of people....anyway if I can help let me know

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